Webinar Surface Measurement System, Dynamic Vapor Sorption (DVS), Application for Amorphous Content Calculations

Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS), Application for Amorphous Content Calculation and in situ Raman studies - Thursday, 30 April 2020 16:00 CEST  - Thursday, 14 May 2020 11:00 CEST

Webinar Surface Measurement System, Dynamic Vapor Sorption (DVS), Application for Amorphous Content Calculations

Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS), Application for Amorphous Content Calculation and in situ Raman studies - Thursday, 30 April 2020 16:00 CEST  - Thursday, 14 May 2020 11:00 CEST

 

DVS WebinarThis webinar will highlight a series of experimental methods of water and organic solvent sorption characterization for determining vapor sorption isotherms of pharmaceutical and food material. Using a novel dynamic flow configuration, this gravimetric experimental system can measure both competitive multicomponent adsorption processes as well as water sorption and glass transition processes. This characterization technique can not only be used across a wide range of materials at different temperatures, but is well suited for adsorption studies using organic vapours at high partial pressures.

This webinar will highlights a few examples of case studies such as amorphous content calculation and glass transition Tg RH (the critical relative humidity at the specific glass transition temperature). Moreover, we will focus on the characterization of an in situ study of camera and Raman applications during a DVS experiment.

Speaker: Dr. Damiano Cattaneo is the Senior Instrumentation Scientist for Surface Measurement Systems

DVS Intrinsic SURFACE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS DVS DYNAMIC VAPOUR SORPTION

The vapour sorption properties of solid materials are recognized as critical factors in determining their storage, stability, processing and application performance. These properties are routinely determined for many natural and man-made materials and have traditionally been evaluated by storing samples in sealed jars containing saturated salt solutions of established relative humidity and then regularly weighing these samples until equilibrium is reached. However, there are a number of disadvantages associated with these manual jar methods.
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